Bill proposed in US to ban animal testing

25-Jun-2015

The Humane Cosmetics Act would ban animal testing for cosmetics

A bipartisan bill banning animal testing on cosmetic products and ingredients, as well as the sale of new animal-tested cosmetics, has been proposed in the United States Congress.

The proposed legislation, called The Humane Cosmetics Act, would ban animal testing after a one-year phasing in period and would be followed by a ban on selling cosmetics newly-tested on animals within three years. The bill was introduced by US Representatives Martha McSally, R-Ariz, Don Beyer, D-Va, Joe Heck, R-Nev and Tony Cárdenas, D-Calif, and was supported by the Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund.

The news comes after years of campaigning by The Humane Society International, including #BeCrueltyFree – said to be the largest campaign in the world to end animal testing in cosmetics. Claire Mansfield, Director of the #BeCrueltyFree campaign, said: "Testing cosmetic chemicals for lipstick and shampoo on live animals isn't just morally indefensible; it also makes poor scientific sense because these animal tests have never been proven reliable to assure human safety. Hundreds of brands produce cosmetics without harming a single animal, and more than 30 countries globally have already banned such testing, so it's time for the United States to catch up and join the #BeCrueltyFree movement."

Game of Thrones actor, Peter Dinklage

Game of Thrones actor, Peter Dinklage

Game of Thrones actor, Peter Dinklage, recently joined Cruelty Free International in welcoming the bill. He said: "Testing cosmetics on animals is a cruel, outdated and unnecessary practice. I am proud to join Cruelty Free International in supporting the Humane Cosmetics Act to end cosmetics testing on animals in the United States." Dinklage has been an Ambassador for the campaign group since 2012.

Sign up for your free email newsletter

US law does not currently require animal testing for cosmetics but it is not yet prohibited.